Minor Player / Variety Act for the week ending
Saturday, 9 May 2009

Simone de Beryl (fl. early 20th Century),
French poses plastique and dancer

Simone de Beryl

Simone de Beryl

(photo: unknown, circa 1915)

Orpheum, Winnipeg, week beginning Monday, 8 April, 1912
'The ladies hold sway at the Orpheum this week. Three of the best acts, including the headliner, are presented by talented and charming daughters of Eve. In one of these acts no less than six women are engaged. In all the other acts but two success is largely dependent on the female portion of the cast. One mere man essays the task of pleasing the audience without any help from the weaker vessels, and it must be said that under the circumstances he succeeds fairly well.
'Mlle. Simon de Beryl, a Parisian actress, presents an elaborate posing act. Her subjects are artistic, and her postures the essence of grace. It is a very charming act and its beauty if enhances by the admirable lighting effects which give each pose a setting at once distinctive and pleasing. Another daughter of the gay French capital, Mlle. Camille Ober, charms with her beautiful soprano solos. She has a voice of rare quality, and sings with dramatic force which is characteristic of the Parisian concert halls. Her forte is in taking high notes. The six Kirksmith Sisters are all musicians, and each and every one scored heavily with the audience. Some excel as vocalists and some as instrumentalists, and their combined efforts are something unusually good in the way of entertainment. To many it was the gem act of the evening.'
(Manitoba Free Press, Winnipeg, Canada, Tuesday, 9 April 1912, p. 8b)

Hammerstein's Roof Garden, New York, Monday, 1 June 1914
'Reconstructed in many particulars, Hammerstein's Roof Garden will open its sixteenth season tomorrow night. In the rôles of Adam and Eve, Emile Agoust and Simone de Beryl will appear in a new dance called ''The Temptation of Adam and Eve.'' The scene is laid in the Garden of Eden and the story of the dance is worked around the incident of the forbidden fruit. An unseen chorus of twenty voices and an augmented orchestra to play special music by Doreé are promised.'
(The New York Times, New York, Sunday, 31 May 1914)

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© John Culme, 2009