Make your own free website on Tripod.com
Footlight Notes banner with Doris Stocker


http://footlightnotes.tripod.com

Images from the Footlight Notes Collection Picture Archive are available on request
to serious researchers and publishers only and for which a fee will be invariably charged.

For further information, please e-mail John Culme;
please be sure to type your e-mail address in the message.

* * * * * * * *

FOOTLIGHT NOTES
no. 598

updated
Saturday, 28 February 2009

FOOTLIGHT NOTES
images of theatre and other popular entertainment
1850s-1920s


a carte de visite photograph of
Alice Régnault (1849-1931), French actress

(photo: Disdéri, Paris, circa 1870)

'A somewhat interesting sale of furniture, jewels, pictures, and objets d'art is to take place on Monday next at the Hôtel Druot, in Paris. The catalogue comprises the whole of the very luxurious belongings of the pretty and talented actress Mdlle. Alice R-, who, though not renouncing the stage, has resolved, nevertheless, to entirely change the life she has for years been leading. in speaking to a friend, who tried to dissuade her from this project, the young actress most emphatically said - ''No; I will keep nothing that can remind me of the past; furniture, jewels, and all shall go; and the thousands they will realise I shall, to the last penny, divide amongst charitable institutions.'' The resolution, which is undoubtedly most praiseworthy, has been prompted by maternal love. May the child deserve well of such a mother is all we need say.'
(The Era, London, Saturday, 19 May 1883, p. 8b)

'The sale by auction in Paris of Mdlle. Alice Regnault's costly furniture and objets d'art, which we announced last week, duly took place on Monday last. A large crown of people assembled in the rooms of the Hotel Drouot, but the bidding was never very brisk. The silver fetched the best prices, as much as 42 being realised for a small pair of candelabra. A pretty marble statue of ''Paris Holding the Apple'' was knocked down for the small sum of 7 4s.; and four pieces of tapestry went for 94, an amount much below their market value. The actress's laces, some of which were very handsome, were bought, at a very low figure, by a lace merchant in the Rue Scribe. The entire proceeds reached only a little over 1,280. A report was current during the same that it is the artist's intention to dispose of the long lease of her magnificent residence in the Avenue du Trocade/ro.'
The Era, London, Saturday, 26 May 1883, p. 8b)

* * * * * * * *


Sign My Guestbook Guestbook by GuestWorld View My Guestbook




Nedstat Counter

© John Culme, 2009