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FOOTLIGHT NOTES
no. 596

updated
Saturday, 14 February 2009

FOOTLIGHT NOTES
images of theatre and other popular entertainment
1850s-1920s


a cabinet photograph if Ida Mulle (d. 1934), American actress and singer,
as Cupid in Orpheus and Eurydice

(photo: Falk, New York, probably 1884)

'The Event of the Season.
'The Bijou Opera Company will appear at Nevada Theater on Saturday evening [16 August 1884] in the brilliant operatic burlesque entitled Orpheus and Eurydice. This Opera is full of pith and scintillates with bright music and amusing situations. The music in the present production is bright, the orchestration competent and the costumes superb. The cast includes many popular favorites and some new people who will be strong cards. Mr. Digby Bell as Jupiter, and Mr. Harry Pepper as Orpheus, do all that can be done in the vocalism and the lines. Mr. George C. Boniface, J., as Styx, the melancholy porter to Pluto, sings ''The Monarch of Arcadia'' with becoming solemnity, and Marie Vanoni does the opera bouffe business of Eurydice with chic enough to make it tell. Miss Billie Barlow, as swift-footed Mercury, recalls the pleasant impression she made in Billie Taylor and other pieces. Miss Amelia Somerville gives an enlarged living picture of an ideal Juno, and Laura Joyce Bell is resplendent in lavender silk, satin stars as Diana. The best work of the evening is accomplished by Miss Ida Mulle as Cupid. She is like a bisque figure of the German-doll type, and as dainty a Cupid as St. Valentine, instead of Jupiter, might have chosen as an emissary, and the applause she gains is accorded without hesitation, and the little lady at once becomes a favorite. The presence of any number of ethereally dressed beauties in Jupiter's Court will carry the opera to the satisfaction of the management and please the jeunesse doree, who delight in the frolic of the can-can, well danced, under the changing lights in a comfortable and pretty theater.'
(Reno Evening Gazette, Reno, Nevada, Thursday, 14 August 1884, p. 3c)

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