Make your own free website on Tripod.com
Footlight Notes banner with Doris Stocker


http://footlightnotes.tripod.com

Footlight Notes Collection Picture Archive - request for use of images.

e-mail John Culme here; please be sure to type your e-mail address in your message.

* * * * * * * *

cards banner

a selection of Footlight Notes handmade greetings cards for you to buy


* * * * * * * *

FOOTLIGHT NOTES
no. 455

updated
Saturday, 3 June 2006

Houp La!
a C.B. Cochran production
starring Gertie Millar, George Graves, Nat D. Ayer and Ida Adams
St. Martin's Theatre, London, 23 November 1916

Ida Adams and chorus

Ida Adams and chorus performing Nat D. Ayer's
'Oh! How She Could Hacki, Yacki, Wicki, Wacki, Woo'
in Houp La!, St. Martin's Theatre, London, 23 November 1916

(photo: Foulsham & Banfield, London, 1916)

Houp La!, with which the St. Martin's Theatre, London, opened on 23 November 1916, was described as a comedy with music. It was written by Fred Thompson and Hugh E. Wright, with music by Nat D. Ayer and Howard Talbot, and lyrics by Percy Greenbank and Hugh E. Wright. Besides Ayer and Wright, other prominent members of the cast were Gertie Millar, George Graves and Ida Adams. The company also included Daisy Burrell, Vera Neville, Margot Erskine, Binnie Hale, Ivy Tresmand and Madeline Choiseuille.

During January and February 1917 a number of the songs from Houp La! were recorded by Ida Adams, Nat D. Ayer, Madeline Choiseuille and Gertie Millar at Hayes, near London, for the HMV label, including Adams and chorus singing 'Oh! How She Could Hacki, Yacki, Wicki, Wacki, Woo' (HMV 03542, 1.68Mb wav file), and Ayer and chorus singing 'I Like a Place Where the Peaches Grow' (HMV C-768, 952Kb wav file).

Ida Adams and chorus


Ida Adams and chorus performing Nat D. Ayer's
'Oh! How She Could Hacki, Yacki, Wicki, Wacki, Woo'
in Houp La!, St. Martin's Theatre, London, 23 November 1916

(photo: Foulsham & Banfield, London, 1916)

'Gertie Millar + George Graves + a clever company, and you have the object material of the enjoyable entertainment with which Charles B. Cochran has opened the most charmingly appointed little theatre in London. The primary object material is, of course, the vocal numbers which begin melodiously and end in the same agreeable fashion, and due credit must be given to Mr. Frank Collins and Mr. J.W. Jackson for the stage production and dances.
'The story, in itself, is very slender, but as a peg it is sill sufficient. Mr. George Graves is an impecunious Circus Proprietor who, in the midst of his financial difficulties makes a book on a day's racing on the cumulative principle and finds himself the possessor of a handsome little fortune at the end of the afternoon's proceedings. Alas, later on, he discovers there has been a mistake about naming the winner for the last event, and bang go the winnings.
'Miss Gertie Millar is the star "turn" of the Circus, and her affections are centred on Mr. Nat D. Ayer, a polo player of distinction, whose fancy, however, transiently wanders in the direction of a fascinating dancer in the person of Miss Ida Adams. This brings about a dramatic little situation in the second act, in which Miss Millar appropriates her rival's cloak, to the unpleasant surprise of her peccant lover.

Nat D. Ayer


Nat D. Ayer as Peter Carey and chorus performing ' I Like a Place Where the Peaches Grow'
in Houp La!, St. Martin's Theatre, London, 23 November 1916

(photo: Foulsham & Banfield, London, 1916)

'A new and welcome addition to Mr. Cochran's artistic ensemble is Mlle. Madeleine Choiseuille, who, in addition to her charming rendering of "L'Amour est Bon," provides infinite mirth in her endeavours to instruct Mr. George Graves in the intricacies of the French language.
'George Graves is George at his best. His dialogue is rich with witticisms, which appear to spring so spontaneously from his fertile imagination and which he utters in that inimitable manner peculiar to himself. I do not think I have ever seen him to more advantage, or happier in his immediate surroundings. Both he and Miss Gertie Millar have most happily adapted themselves to the concentrated atmosphere of the theatre, and their united efforts make a perfect blend of delightful comedy.
'Mr. Nat D. Ayer does full justice to himself in the triple capacity of actor, vocalist and composer.
'As for the charming demoiselles who appear in minor parts, and those who constitute the ensemble, their photographic records barely do them justice, not that I mean to cast any reflection of the art work of Messrs. Foulsham & Banfield. They are just it!'
(B.W. Findon, The Play Pictorial, no. 177, vol. XXIX, Houp La! issue, London, 1917, p. 82)

* * * * * * * *


If you have enjoyed your visit to Footlight Notes,
please consider making a donation to help me keep it alive and fresh
by going to PayPal's 'Send Money Online - Free' page.
Follow the instructions and please use my e-mail address - jculme@aol.com.
Thank you, John Culme.


Sign My Guestbook Guestbook by GuestWorld View My Guestbook




Nedstat Counter

© John Culme, 2006